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Water-based Screenprint

Hopson-Walker

Session 1:

July 4-9

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This Workshop is an introductory course in water-based screen printing, designed to present the basic techniques and concepts of the medium as a fine art form.  All techniques will emphasize non-toxic / less-toxic methods and materials.  Techniques covered will include direct methods (paper stencils, hand-drawn stencils, and monotypes), and indirect methods (photographic & autographic stencils).  Students will be encouraged to adopt an experimental approach toward screen printing production, while also developing an awareness of the traditional aspects of the medium, such as the significance of layering, appropriation, the multiple in art, edition work, and collaborative printing.  No prior experience is required.

Born and raised in Fresno, CA; Matthew Hopson-Walker received his BFA in Printmaking from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1998. After several years of playing in a heavy metal band and working at various bars and liquor stores he then received his MA in 2002 followed by his MFA in 2003, both from the University of Iowa.  Hopson-Walker is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art and Design at California State University at Fresno.  In 2006 he was recipient of the prestigious James D. Phelan Award in Printmaking given by the San Francisco Foundation and administered by the KALA Institute. Hopson-Walker has been included in 172 juried and group exhibitions and 12 solo shows since 2006. His work is in the collections of the Franklin Furnace Artist Book Collection at the Museum Of Modern Art in New York; the University of North Dakota Art Collections in Grand Forks, North Dakota; the Amity Art Foundation in Woodbridge, Connecticut; the Stonehouse Residency for the Contemporary Arts in Miramonte, California; the Drawing and Print Collection at The University of Iowa Museum Of Art; and the Tama Art University Museum in Tokyo, Japan.

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Intaglio

Kosten

Session 1:

July 4-9

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In this class we will cover the basics of traditional multiple plate intaglio using a key image plate as a foundation for advanced color image development. The intaglio plate is a very tactile, workable surface which can be manipulated in order to achieve a wide array of aesthetic possibilities. Participants will begin with a key plate with basic line etch and aquatint which will then be transferred onto additional color plates. A number of methods and techniques will be demonstrated during the week such as stage line etch, aquatint, soft ground, subtractive method, spit bite, and a la poupee. Students of all levels of experience are welcome to participate.

After spending his formative years in Memphis, Tennessee, Andrew Kosten received a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in painting from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri in 2001. Upon discovering the potential of the medium of printmaking, Mr. Kosten pursued a Master of Fine Arts degree in printmaking from the University of South Dakota in 2005. From 2009 to 2013, Andrew taught drawing and printmaking at The University of Southern Indiana and Middle Tennessee State University.

Andrew Kosten currently resides in Brookings, South Dakota and specializes in intaglio and lithographic print media through his own print shop and studio, Gum Pal Press. His work has been shown in national and international juried exhibitions and is featured in numerous public and private collections. Andrew has received various awards and has works in a number of public and private collections across the country.

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Wrastlin’ and Rockin’ (on Stone Lithography)

O’Connor

Session 1:

July 4-9

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Working on limestone is like nothing else in the world.  Its porous nature offers many opportunities: from drawing, to scratching, to photo-transfers, to impressing different greasy materials onto the surface.  Designed for all skill levels, this course will cover how to etch and process a delicate crayon drawing, ink consistency, registration, and printing.  Safe health practices will be emphasized and greener methods of rub-up/ wash out will be shared.  Special demonstrations will include working with colored pencils and china markers as cost-effective drawing material alternatives; as well as, experimenting with other greasy materials on stones.  Other discussions may include image transfer, additive and reductive work, and combining lithography with other printmaking processes.  To conclude the workshop, O’Connor will host an epic arm-wrestling match that be etched and printed!

Meghan O’Connor earned a BFA at East Tennessee State University and an MFA at Clemson University. In addition to teaching at Wayne State College, she is also active within Southern Graphics Council International, the Mid America Print Council, and FATE (Foundations in Art: Theory and Education).

O’Connor’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. In addition to solo exhibitions, she has had work included in the Parkside National Small Print Exhibition, Southern Graphics Council International Members Exhibition, and A Curious Bestiary: Chimeras and Cryptozoology from American Printmakers at Davidson Galleries in Seattle, WA. Her work can be found in permanent collections, such as Columbia College in Chicago; Gippsland Centre for Art and Design in Australia; Limerick School of Art and Design in Ireland; Proyecto ‘ace Print Collection in Argentina, and many other collections around the world.

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The Intersection of Zines and Artist Books

Sheehan

Session 1:

July 4-9

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Zines are the ultimate democratic multiple: they are cheap and easy to make and affordable to buy. Artist’s books on the other hand, often fit more comfortably in the fine art world, with a more refined feel than the punk, DIY vibe of the zine world. In this workshop, we will focus on the intersection of art zines and artist’s books.

Participants will learn a number of simple book structures including one-page books, pamphlet stitch books, and modified accordions as well as exploring variations to expand the possibilities of those structures. We will also cover some simple printing techniques that require little-to-no equipment including trace monotypes, transfers, and pochoir. Finally, we will focus our discussions on distribution and exhibition, exploring the potential lives our works can have after they leave our hands. Students can expect to leave the class with a set of binding models, knowledge of the simple printing techniques covered, a zine exchange, and a small artist’s book.

Beth Sheehan is a printmaker, papermaker, and book artist living in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Her work investigates ideas of memory and perception to explore her own lack of episodic memory. Her work has been exhibited internationally and is held in public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Center for Book Arts, and the San Francisco Public Library. Sheehan has worked as a professional printer at Durham Press in Pennsylvania and at Harlan and Weaver in New York. She was also the Lead Binder and Bindery Manager at Small Editions in Brooklyn and teaches paper, print, and book workshops around the country.k in the collections of Yale University, Guangdong Museum of Art, and many more.

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Mokulito (Wood Lithography)

Sippel

Session 1:

July 4-9

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MOKULITO  (moku/wood – lito/lithography) is an alternative printmaking process based on the principles of Lithography.  Mokulito was discovered in Japan by Professor Seishi Ozaku over 35 years ago. His process replaces the traditional Bavarian stone used in lithography with a sheet of plywood, which possesses similar characteristics in comparison to lithographic stone. Using a plywood matrix, allows the artist to make up to 25 prints. The discovery of Mokulito by Prof. Ozaku has allowed a blend of purely lithographic traces and sharp woodcut marks.

Mokulito has been protected by Japanese printmakers for much of its existence, holding it as an undiscovered art process to those outside of Japan; however, artists like Ewa Budka who introduced the process to me and others are now rediscovering the practice, pushing it to new limits and passing the technique on to other artists around the globe. Without the use of acids or solvents, the Mokulito process is ideal for beginners and printmakers from all backgrounds.  A variety of inks common to other processes can be used and Mokulito impressions are printed using an etching press which make etching presses much more versatile. Participants will use acrylic paint, sharpie paint markers, acrylic spray paint and toner crayons to work on small plywood plates for printing small editions.  Relief applications are also often used in combination with drawing materials.

Jeffrey Sippel graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire in 1976 and studied at the Tamarind Institute from 1977 to 1979. Upon the completion of his studies at the Tamarind Institute he was certified as a master printer. He later received an MFA at Arizona State University.  Sippel organized the lithography studio at Druckhaus EA Quensen, worked as Master Printer at Ocean Works LEL and has taught at The Ohio State University and Tamarind Institute. Sippel currently teaches at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. Specializing in waterless lithography, polyester plate lithography, and mokulito (wood lithography), his work is included in many renowned collections, including the Smithsonian Institution.

Additionally, Sippel’s many presentations include lecturing in the Soviet Union, Finland, South Africa, Chile, Belgium, Poland, Germany, Bulgaria, Mexico, New Zealand, Canada and a long list of venues in the United States of America.  Sippel has exhibited his work in over 200 venues including the Lalit Kala Academy, the Cecille R. Hunt Gallery, Webster University, the Haggar Gallery, the University of Dallas, the Steinberg Gallery of Art, Washington University, St. Louis, the Lauren Rogers Museum of Art, the Knoxville Museum of Art, the Grunwald Center for the Arts,

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Exploring Collagraph

Yoon

Session 1:

July 4-9

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Collagraph is a non-toxic intaglio printmaking technique. Unlike etching, collagraph does not require any acid to process the image while the marks and textures resemble those of traditional etching. Using a plastic surface (such as Sintra, condensed foam board, Plexiglas or Masonite), one can build an image with various textured materials such as acrylic medium, modeling paste, and carborundum as well as various textured papers. During the workshop, students will explore various ways of achieving tonalities, textures, and painterly marks on a plate. Several other alternative options such as using shaped plates and transferring photocopy images will be introduced.

Rina Yoon is a Korean born visual artist and a professor of Fine Art at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design in Wisconsin. Yoon received a BFA in Fine Arts from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas and an MFA in Printmaking from Washington University in St. Louis. Yoon focuses on non-traditional printmaking methods including large scale prints, paper installations, multi-media work combining video and sculptural elements with printmaking. Driven by curiosity and sensitivity to materials, Yoon often embraces slow processes to allow time for reflection and meditation. Yoon’s work has been widely exhibited in the United States as well as South Korea, China, India, Italy and Poland.

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Mokuhanga

Brodbeck

Session 2:

July 11-16

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At the onset of this mokuhanga workshop, participants will make a two-color print from prepared blocks using; water-based pigments, kento registration, and pressing with a baren – all hallmarks of this Japanese woodblock printmaking process dating back to the 17th century. We will then move into designing, carving and printing our own designs with thorough demonstrations of each step along the way including bokashi (color gradation). Examples of color layering and other printing techniques unique to the process will also be shown. At the workshops’ closing, we will have the option of exchanging prints with one another.

Mary Brodbeck received her BFA from Michigan State University in Industrial design in 1982 and worked as a furniture designer for a dozen years – many of her designs hold US patents – before shifting to image making in the 1990’s. She studied Japanese woodblock printmaking in Tokyo with Yoshisuke Funasaka on a Japanese government BUNKA-Cho Fellowship in 1998 and obtained her MFA from Western Michigan University 1999. Her place-based woodblock prints have received critical acclaim in both Japan and the United States and can be found in the collections of the Detroit Institute of Arts, Muskegon Museum of Art, Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park, and in many other public and private holdings worldwide. Mary continues to make her colorful woodblock prints from adventures during her explorations and travels. Her home base is Kalamazoo, Michigan.

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Outlaw Relief

Fick & Huck

Session 2:

July 11-16

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Learn how to make expressive super graphic relief prints with two of America’s original Outlaw Printmakers. We will cover linocut and woodcut techniques with an emphasis on how to maximize narrative content. This will include learning bold compositional strategies, how to dream up unforgettable characters, learning the secret recipe for visual punch and diving into the thick mud of satirical artistry. Introductory level methods will be covered (including block preparation, carving skills and smooth inking techniques) but students will be expected to hit the ground running.

Bill Fick is the founder/co-director of Supergraphic, a printmaking studio in Durham, North Carolina. He is also a Visiting Lecturing Fellow in the Department of Art, Art History and Visual Studies at Duke University. His work has been exhibited from New York City to Seoul, South Korea and can be found in the collections of the Fogg Art Museum, Cambridge, Massachusetts; The New York Public Library, New York, New York; and the Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University. In 1993 Fick was awarded a National Endowment for the Arts Visual Artist Fellowship and in 1995 a North Carolina Arts Council Artist Fellowship. Fick is also co-author with Beth Grabowski of “Printmaking: A Complete Guide to Materials and Processes” published by Laurence King Publishing, London. Fick is also the Co-director of the Zine Machine Printed Matter Festival in Durham, NC and a consultant for Speedball Art Products, where you’ll find his Supergraphic Black Professional Relief Ink.

Tom Huck (born 1971) is an American printmaker best known for his large-scale satirical woodcuts. He lives and works in St. Louis, Missouri, where he runs his own press, Evil Prints. He is a regular contributor to BLAB! of Fantagraphics Books. His work is influenced by Albrecht Dürer, José Guadalupe Posada, R. Crumb, and Honoré Daumier. Huck’s illustrations have appeared in publications such as The Village Voice, The Riverfront Times, and the Minneapolis City Pages.

Huck’s woodcut prints are included in numerous public and private collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, Library of Congress, Spencer Museum of Art, Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, Saint Louis Art Museum, Milwaukee Art Museum, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Art Institute of Chicago, Fogg Art Museum, Michael C. Carlos Museum, and New York Public Library. Huck has been represented by David Krut Art Projects in New York; Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art in Kansas City, Missouri; Duane Reed Gallery in St. Louis, Missouri; Eli Ridgway Gallery in San Francisco, California; and beginning in October 2017 Huck’s gallery representation is C. G. Boerner in New York.

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Mezzotint / Tonal Intaglio

Carrie Lingscheit

Session 2:

July 11-16

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From bold, hard-edged graphics to whisper-subtle tonal gradations – no matter your aesthetic or style, intaglio can deliver!  This course will introduce multiple methods of creating tone, texture and linework using both etching (ferric chloride on copper) and various non-acid techniques and tool usage.  Instructional demos will include mezzotint, hard and soft ground, stage-bite aquatint, spit bite, toner wash, texture transfer, blind embossment, and various drypoint methods.  In addition to image development and constructing mezzotint rocker jigs, this course will also address inking and printing methods such as à la poupée and multiple-plate registration. Participants can expect to view and discuss many diverse examples of intaglio print work, receive group and individual feedback, and work to complete one or more prints during the workshop.

Carrie Lingscheit’s original intaglio prints exploit the subtleties of etching and mezzotint technique to explore themes of human behavior, interaction and the malleable nature of remembrance, presenting equivocal narratives that are often characterized by omission, distortion, and hyperbole. Her work has been included in numerous national and international exhibitions and in dozens of invitational exchange portfolios. Recent exhibitions include the 2018 Delta National Small Prints Exhibition, the 3rd International Mezzotint Festival in Ekaterinburg, Russia; and the 2017 Washington Printmakers National Small Works Juried Exhibition in Washington DC. Lingscheit holds a BFA from The University of South Dakota (2006) and MFA from Ohio University (2010.) She currently lives in Urbana, IL.

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Plate Lithography

Emmy Lingscheit

Session 2:

July 11-16

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In this course students will explore the possibilities of both aluminum and polyester lithography plates for making multi-color lithographs. Together these plates offer an alternative to stone lithography that is portable, relatively simple to process and print, and very versatile. Techniques will be demonstrated for building up a drawing on an aluminum ball-grained plate, and for preparing additional registered color layers using polyester plates. Participants will learn various means of image generation, from traditional hand-drawing to incorporation of digital and photographic imagery via transfers and more. Techniques for registration, paper preparation, color ink mixing, and printing will be covered. Participants are encouraged to bring source imagery and/or preliminary sketches in order to dive right in to the project. The class will be structured to accommodate participants at all technical levels.

Emmy Lingscheit’s work investigates the ambiguities and exchanges between organisms and non-organisms, and between humans and non-humans. Lingscheit’s prints, drawings, and sculptural works explore the myriad ways in which we are enmeshed with the non-human world, from the cellular level to the global economy, and their implications for the ecological and climatic challenges we face. She has held residencies at the Highpoint Center for Printmaking in Minneapolis, MN; Zygote Press in Cleveland, OH; Ucross in Sheridan, WY; and at the Kohler Arts/Industry Program studios in Kohler, WI. Her work has been exhibited widely, including at Davidson Galleries in Seattle, WA; Nash Gallery in Minneapolis, MN; and The International Print Center in New York, NY; as well as a solo show at John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, WI. She holds a BFA in painting from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota, and an MFA in printmaking from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Emmy is currently an Associate Professor at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where she is also the coordinator of printmaking.

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Luscious Layered Letterpress

O’Connell

Session 2:

July 11-16

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Participants in this workshop will produce multilayered letterpress edition prints or books that feature several relief techniques — pressure printing from stencils to create background pattern/texture layers, text or typographic studies from a wide selection of both metal and wood typefaces, and relief images from either the Fine Arts Press collection of found printer’s cuts or the artist’s own carved blocks. Printmakers can work on one of four Vandercooks, two show card proof presses, or a Pearl clamshell. The UNO letterpress lab holds over 300 cases of metal type, 30 cases of wood type, 12 cases of printer’s cuts, and a wide assortment of ornament and decorative materials sufficient to enable your wildest letterpress fantasies.

Bonnie O’Connell earned her BA in art from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Master’s from The University of Iowa. From 1985-2019, she taught book arts and letterpress printing classes at The University of Nebraska-Omaha, and produced fine press limited editions of contemporary poetry for Abattoir Editions. She also maintains The Penumbra Press, her private press imprint for literary fine printing. In recent years she has issued mixed media letterpress works on social and art issues, as well as sculptural books and assemblages. Her offset artist’s book, The Anti-Warhol Museum: Proposals for the Socially Responsible Disposal of Warholia was co-published with Nexus Press, Atlanta in 1993. Her unique bindings and edition books are featured in over 50 artist’s book or fine press collections and have appeared in numerous national exhibitions.

Published essays on the book arts have appeared in Books at Iowa, and Abracadabra. She contributed letterpress prints to several portfolio exchanges, among them Sock & Kiss, an international print portfolio coordinated for the 2001 Print Symposium in Cortona, Italy, Pandora’s Box for the Chicago Center for Book and Paper Arts, Mutanabbi Street Starts Here for the San Francisco Center for the Book, The Vandercook Book, from The New York Center for the Book Arts in 2009, and the Frogman Print Portfolio in 2013 and 2018. She’s been awarded grants from The Nebraska Arts Council, The Woman’s Studio Workshop, and The National Endowment for the Arts. A founding member of the College Book Art Association, she also teaches at The Penland School of Crafts, most recently a letterpress workshop “Perf / Cut / Score / Fold”. Venues for solo exhibitions include Museum of Nebraska Art, the Lux Center, Constellation Studios, and St. Cecelia’s Cathedral Arts Project.

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Selection and Combinations

Yamamoto

Session 2:

July 11-16

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This workshop will explore print processes to discover diverse compositions in various formats.  Participants will experiment with intaglio, relief and monotype as the base graphic tools. Participants will also learn effective Chine-collé techniques to utilize different visual languages in one format.  The emphasis will be on hard ground etching, engraving, relief print and monotype. Participants are encouraged to bring finished intaglio plates and relief blocks. We will spend some time making plates and blocks, but printing will be the essential part of this workshop.

Koichi Yamamoto was born in Osaka, Japan and grew up in Wyoming. He earned his BFA at PNCA in Portland then moved to Poland and Slovakia in 90’s. He completed his MFA at the University of Alberta and later he got his first teaching position at Utah State University. He moved to the University of Delaware in 2006 and since 2007 he has been teaching at University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

Yamamoto is an artist who merges the traditional and contemporary by creating unique and innovative approaches to the language of printmaking. He has worked with meticulous copper engravings to large-scale monotypes. Most recently he has been focusing on making kites.